National Eye Health Week report finds Britain’s eye health out of focus

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MILLIONS are risking their eyesight by not getting regular eye tests – despite it being the sense they treasure the most, according to a report from National Eye Health Week .

The Generation Eye Report(1) – found almost 14 million people in the UK are not having an eye test as recommended at least every two years, despite 55 per cent saying deteriorating vision is their biggest worry about getting older.

The research, unveiled on the first day of National Eye Health Week (19 to 25 September), investigated the value people place on their vision and the depth of knowledge in the UK about eye health. Based on a survey of more than 2000 UK adults it revealed three quarters (75%) of people had suffered poor eye health in the last 12 months and more than one in five (22%) said this had restricted or impaired their daily life. This is despite studies showing that nearly half of all cases of sight loss are preventable2.

David Cartwright, Chair of National Eye Health Week, says: ‘What our study found was that millions are totally in the dark when it comes to eyes and eye health.

‘National Eye Health Week aims to raise awareness of the importance of good eye health and the need for regular eye tests for all. An eye test at an opticians is quick and easy, and for a lot of people, including children and over-60s, is free on the NHS.

‘Poor eye health is affecting every aspect of daily life. This National Eye Health Week, our message is clear: people across the UK, of all backgrounds, age groups and genders need to recognise that our vision is both precious and fragile, and thus the risks to it need to be understood, accepted and addressed.’

Despite the number of people not getting regular tests, the report found deteriorating vision was people’s number one fear of getting old – ahead of illness (50%) and losing their hearing (32%).

Dr Nigel Best, says: ‘The Generation Eye Report makes startling reading. Millions are risking losing their sight unnecessarily because they fail to have regular sight tests and make poor life style choices

‘Half of all sight loss cases are preventable – and a simple eye test can be the first step in prevention.

‘Raising awareness and educating people on the importance of looking after their eyes through regular testing and better lifestyle choices is absolutely vital to addressing the nation’s eye health problems.’

The report focused on three key groups: 18 – 24 year olds (The Unseen Generation), their parents (New Presbyopes) aged between 45 and 54 and their grandparents aged 65 and over (The Low Vision Generation).

Worryingly it found those aged 18-24 were the group whose quality of vision or state of eye health had most restricted or impaired their daily life (36%), with around a third (32%) not having an eye test in the last two years.

The report found 80% of 45 – 54 year olds said they’d experienced problems with their eye health in the last year.

While 94% of over-65s wore prescription eyewear however almost a third (32%) didn’t know wearing the wrong prescription glasses or contact lenses could affect their eyesight.

 

 

(1)The Generation Eye report is based on the findings of a survey commissioned by National Eye health week and Specsavers. The survey was conducted by Atomik Research, in accordance with MRS guidelines and regulations, on a representative sample of 2002 UK respondents aged 18+ between 24 – 31 August 2016. All figures quoted in this release are from this study unless otherwise quoted.

Published: 19 September 2016

Source – Visionmatters.org


Your Eyes and Driving – Look After Your Eyes

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What considerations do people with sight problems need to make when driving?

It’s important to have your sight tested if you think you may have a problem with your eyesight, in fact, studies suggest that up to one in five middle aged drivers are taking to the road knowing their eyesight is not as good as it should be. It is not just common sense to ensure your eyesight is good enough to enable you to drive comfortably, but you will be breaking the law if it isn’t.

What is the legal responsibility?

A driver of a car or motorbike must be able to read a number plate, with symbols, 79mm high by 50mm wide, from a distance of 20 metres AND a driver should have a visual acuity of at least 6/12 with both eyes open.  This can be done with glasses or contact lenses if you usually wear them. The law also requires drivers to have a wide field of vision, your optometrist will tell you if you may not meet the field of vision standard. Bus and Larry drivers are required to have a higher standard of vision.

If you are not able to do this, your insurance may be invalidated. Driving with uncorrected defective vision is an offence punishable with a heavy fine, penalty licence points and possible driving disqualification.

The eyesight test involving reading number plates is conducted as part of the driving test. As the law stands however, no further sight checks are needed until the driver reaches the age of 70, so the responsibility lies with you to ensure you wear corrective eyewear if necessary. Check your vision regularly by reading a number plate from a distance of 20 metres. If you notice any changes, visit your optometrist for an eye examination.

 

What if I have been diagnosed with glaucoma?

If you have been diagnosed with glaucoma in both eyes, this will affect the amount you can see, and the law says that you must tell the DVLA (Driver and Vehicle Licensing Authority). You may have to take some extra tests, but most people are still allowed to carry on driving.  You can find out more at www.direct.gov.uk/driverhealth

 

How can people ensure their vision is roadworthy?

Always wear an up-to-date pair of glasses or contact lenses while driving, if they are needed, and go for a regular sight test to make sure your prescription is up to date. It’s a good idea to keep a spare pair of glasses in your vehicle too; in France and some other European countries drivers who wear glasses must, by law, carry a spare pair in the car. If possible, have an anti-reflection coat on your glasses and keep your car windscreen clean inside and out so you can see as clearly as possible.

 

What can occur specifically when driving at night to impact our driving?

Night driving is certainly more demanding than driving during the day; this is particularly true of older people, who may test well with their optometrist, but struggle to focus on the road at night.  If you notice any particular difference in your vision when driving by night, it’s important to see your optometrist for advice. I would also point out that tinted lenses should not be used for night driving, and to make sure your windscreen is clean on the inside and outside.

 


Children’s Eyesight Risk In The Frame

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A recent survey revealed that children now spend nearly five hours a day using the likes of Facebook, watching films & TV and messaging friends.

As an optician it’s worrying that children are spending so long doing such activities as there’s a chance they could be risking their long-term eye health without knowing it.

The problem is blue light which, put simply, is part of the visible light spectrum that we use to see the world. “Good” blue light (Blue-Turquoise) is essential for children’s vision, development and well-being. “Bad” blue light (Blue-Violet) can be harmful to their developing eyes.

What many people don’t know is that blue-violet light is emitted by computers, tablets, smart phones and flat-screen TVs however, banning children from using tech is not really a practical solution and children are actually exposed to higher amounts of blue-violet light in other ways. In homes and schools, energy saving light bulbs radiate this light, while outdoors, come rain or shine, significant amounts of ultra-violet (UV) and blue light from sunlight reach ground level.

The effects of UV rays and blue-violet light are cumulative and can accelerate the development of eye disease during adult life. With an increased exposure to technology much earlier in life and children spending three times more time outside than adults we need to think about protecting their eyes now. Here are my top tips:

Diet – serve up green leafy veg like spinach, kale and broccoli

Tech – limit the amount of time spent on tablets, smartphones or watching TV and encourage them to keep their eyes as far away from the screen as possible.

Sunglasses – a pair of good quality sunglasses offers tremendous protection

Indoors – a new of prescription spectacle lens, Crizal Prevencia, will protect indoors and out. It is designed to let “good” Blue-Turquoise light in and filter out “bad” Blue-Violet light.

Optician – the best thing you can do for your eye health is go for regular eye checks with a trained professional at least every two years.

Riskometer – check your child’s exposure to blue light by using the www.thinkaboutyoureyes.co.uk “Blue Light Riskometer”

Source – Andy Hepworth, Optician


Retinal Imaging Offers a Better View and Early Detection

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Digital retinal imaging uses high-resolution imaging systems to take pictures of the inside of your eye. This helps our Optician to assess the health of your retina and helps them to detect and manage such eye and health conditions as glaucoma, diabetes, and macular degeneration. Finding retinal disorders as early as possible is critical to potentially preventing serious disease progression and even vision loss.

 

 

A Piece of History

In addition to helping detect diseases early, retinal images provide a permanent and historical record of changes in your eye. Images can be compared side-by-side, year after year, to discover even subtle changes and help monitor your health.

Retinal images also make it easier for your doctor to educate you about your health and wellness. The two of you can review your images together, and your doctor can point out the various structures of the retina and explain treatment options for any conditions revealed by the pictures. The more you know about eye diseases, the more likely you will understand and follow your opticians recommendations for treatment and prevention.

Here are just some of the diseases retinal imaging can help a optician notice or see more closely:

Age-related Macular Degeneration
Macular degeneration is usually signified by leaking of fluid or bleeding in the back of the eye. This causes central vision loss.

Cancer
A dark spot at the back of the eye may signal a melanoma, which can grow unnoticed within the retina. If caught early, melanomas can be treated before they cause serious damage and travel to other areas of the body through the bloodstream.

Diabetic Retinopathy
Diabetes can cause changes in the blood vessels of the retina, like swelling and leakage or the creation of new blood vessels. Blindness can result without early detection.

Glaucoma
Pressure against the optic nerve and compression of the eye’s blood vessels may indicate glaucoma. This disease causes permanent and irreversible vision loss.

Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)
Signs of high blood pressure often appear first in the eye. Indicators can include narrowing of the blood vessels, spots on the retina, or bleeding in the back of the eye.

Retinal Detachment
Retinas can lift or pull away from the wall of the eye. If not properly treated, this can cause permanent vision loss.

Unia Opticians Performs Retinal Imaging with our Eye Test Contact us to find out more

 


Why Are My Eyes Yellow

Eyes can say a lot about a person. These organs not only offer insight into a personality but can offer clues to the body’s overall health.

When the whites of the eyes turn yellow, it generally indicates that something is going on in the body that causes jaundice. Jaundice describes a yellowish tint to the skin and the whites of the eyes.

Excessively high levels of bilirubin in the blood cause jaundice. Bilirubin is a yellow waste substance found in bile, the liquid the liver makes to help break down fats.

When there is too much bilirubin in the bloodstream, it may leach into surrounding tissues like skin and eye tissues, causing them to yellow. Jaundice has different causes in adults, children, and newborns.

Contents of this article:

Anatomy of the eye

Jaundice mainly affects the front of the eye as this is where the yellow pigment would be visible.

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A diagram of the eye. Jaundice is often seen in the sclera, iris, and eyelid.

It’s important to understand the anatomy of the front of the eye to understand how jaundice affects the eye. The front part of the eye is made of several different parts:

  • Eyelid and lashes: Upper and lower lids and lashes offer eyes protection from dirt and dust. They are also used to blink so the eyes stay moist. If jaundice is present, both the outer eyelids and the underside of the eyelid that is visible when the lid is lifted may have a yellow tint.
  • Pupil: The pupil is the dark center of each eye that controls the amount of light that enters. Generally, jaundice does not discolor the pupils.
  • Iris: The iris is the colored part of the eye immediately surrounding the pupils. It has muscles that contract the pupils. Yellowing may be seen in the iris if a person has jaundice.
  • Sclera: The whites of the eye. The sclera surrounds the iris and protects the fragile structures on the inside of the eye. Yellow eyes are often first noticed because the sclera yellows.

Causes of yellow eyes in newborns

Jaundice in newborns is very common because a newborn’s liver is still maturing. Bilirubin often builds up faster than a newborn’s immature liver can break it down, causing jaundice to occur frequently.

Aside from a yellowing of the skin, one of the clearest signs of jaundice in a newborn is the yellowing of the eyes.

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Jaundice is common in newborns as their livers are still developing.

Yellow eyes are only one symptom of newborn jaundice. New parents should also watch for the following symptoms:

  • Yellow skin
  • Lack of energy
  • Irritability
  • Fever
  • Trouble with eating

Any newborn with these symptoms should be checked immediately by a medical professional.

Most cases of newborn jaundice are harmless and resolve on their own as the baby’s liver matures.

Normal newborn jaundice causes include:

  • Physiological jaundice: Many newborns have this type of jaundice, due to the newborn’s still-developing liver. It normally appears when a baby is 2 to 4 days old.
  • Breastfeeding: Breastfeeding can cause jaundice when a baby isn’t getting enough breast milk to flush the bilirubin out. This type of jaundice often resolves when a mother’s milk comes in.
  • Breast milk: Occasionally, substances in breast milk cause a baby’s intestines to hold onto bilirubin rather than pass it through stool. This form of jaundice normally resolves itself by 12 weeks.

Some causes of newborn jaundice may be more concerning. These causes include:

  • Blood incompatibility jaundice: When a mother and baby don’t have compatible blood types, the mother’s body may attack the baby’s red blood cells while it is in the womb. As the mother’s antibodies are already breaking down the baby’s red blood cells before birth, this type of jaundice may present itself as early as 1 day old.
  • Jaundice of prematurity: Premature babies are at the greatest risk of jaundice because their livers are very immature. Premature babies may have more severe jaundice or jaundice alongside a number of other conditions.
  • Infections: Some bacterial infections like sepsiscan cause a newborn to have jaundice.
  • Hemorrhage: Internal bleeding can cause jaundice. Premature babies are particularly at risk from hemorrhages.

While most cases of normal jaundice are mild to moderate, more severe newborn jaundice is possible. Cases of mild jaundice may resolve themselves while more moderate jaundice can be treated with light therapy.

Very severe cases may be treated with a blood transfusion. A pediatrician will be on the lookout for jaundice at a baby’s first checkup.

Causes of yellow eyes in older children and adults

In older children and adults, yellow eyes are always concerning because jaundice is not common in these age groups.

Unlike yellow skin, which may be from eating too many yellow and orange vegetables, yellow eyes are nearly always a sign of jaundice. Yellow eyes and jaundice in older children and adults normally indicate an underlying medical issue.

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Yellow eyes in older children and adults often signal an underlying medical problem.

There are three main reasons for jaundice to occur:

  • Liver disease or liver injury: Liver problems cause a type of jaundice known as hepatocellular jaundice.
  • Breakdown of red blood cells: When red blood cells are broken down too quickly, there is an increase in bilirubin production.

A blockage in the bile duct system: When the tubes that carry the bile from the liver to the gallbladder and intestines get blocked, bilirubin can’t leave the liver and builds up excessively. This type of jaundice is called obstruction jaundice

Source Jenna Fletcher. Medical News Today

Contact us to book a Eye Health Check Click Here


Modo Eyewear Update. Indroducing Derek LAM..

With misty blues and smoky purples, our three new optical and three new sun shapes each have their own unique features that take their inspiration from Fall/Winter 2016’s popular earth and sky tones.

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The new sun styles use the acetate/metal combinations to showcase the season’s contemporary colors and textures.

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For optical, the feminine square shape 278 pairs colorful acetates with a metal bridge and detailing. Colors like matte misty blue and a red-brown rust
feather bring new soft textures to a square style.

To Try these on contact us Click Here

To View the DEREK LAM look book Click Here


More European brands in stock

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We are now stocking more European brands that ever.

In addition to Lindberg (Denmark), Gotti (Switzerland), Mykita (Germany), Etnia Barcelona (Spain), Silhouette (Austria) and Modo (Italy), we have recently added Frame Holland’s Preciosa range and Belgium’s Kinto brand to our collections.

 


New in Adidas Performance Eyewear

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Movistar Team featuring the new adidas Zonyk Pro

 

adidas Sport eyewear has today unveiled the latest model of its Performance sport collection – the zonyk pro – designed to provide athletes with equipment that meets their demands – to achieve the very best.

In order to create the most advanced and functional eyewear possible, the zonyk pro has been specially developed in close cooperation with and for athletes. The zonyk pro has been engineered and designed to amplify performance – as well as appearance – and takes full advantage of the adidas Sport eyewear lens range. Wearers are given the choice of polarized, mirror, LST™ and Vario options to ensure that perfect vision can be achieved whatever the weather or lighting conditions.

The zonyk pro Movistar version (AD02 6057 pictured) with brand new combined Vario mirror filters hit the start line at the 2016 edition of the Tour de France.

Movistar Team have had a fantastic season, winning the ‘Team of the Tour De France’ award, with two individual riders in the top six.

At La Vuelta, they have shown a supreme performance so far, with Nairo Quintana leading. The Colombian wears the leader’s jersey in Vuelta a España for the second time in his career after a fantastic La Camperona climb, putting half a minute on Contador, Froome and Alejandro Valverde, who remains 2nd overall.

As a team, Movistar are leading in all classifications in the Vuelta, with Quintana first in the GC, KOM and Combination rankings; Valverde in green as Points leader; and the Blues on top of the Team prize.

For more information, about the zonyk pro or any Adidas sports performace product please contact us.


New test needed to assess the quality and safety of sunglasses

Revision of standards is needed to test sunglasses quality and establish safe limits for the lenses’ UV filters, according to research published in the open access journal Biomedical Engineering OnLine.

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Sunglasses and UV protection

Exposure to the sun may deteriorate your sunglasses over time and the lenses may become lighter and so alter the category under which they are classified. It may also diminish the impact resistance of lenses (how ‘shatterproof’ the lens is). Current national and regional standards require that sunglasses provide levels of UV protection linked to the luminous transmittance, which decides the category of the lenses.

Lenses should provide adequate UV filters, because insufficient protection could lead to pathological modifications to the cornea and to the internal structure of the eye. This could cause edema (swelling of the eye which can distort vision), pterygium (growth of pink, fleshy tissue on the white of the eye that can interfere with vision), cataract (clouding of the lens of the eye) and retina damage.

Contact us if you would like to discuss the benefits of sunglasses or to book an Eye Health Exam

Article Credit http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/312587.php