Innovative new sunglasses from Silhouette

‘Arthur Arbesser for Silhouette’ is a collection of four brightly coloured, ultra-stylish sunglasses.

Silhouette is committed to supporting young designers and unearthing great design talent. Each year, Silhouette invites an up-and-coming designer to design a range of sunglasses using Silhouette’s iconic frame, the TMA, as their template. This year is the turn of internationally acclaimed fashion designer, Arthur Arbesser.

Internationally known as one of the most promising new designers in Milan, Arthur was born and raised in Vienna. He studied at Central St. Martins in London and worked for Armani for 7 years before launching his own label in 2013 at Milan’s fashion week.

Call in to Unia Opticians, on Strutton Ground, to try the these amazingly lightweight, beautiful styles, as long as stocks last!

As seen in Grazia magazine

 


New frames ranges now in.

We are really excited about the new Gucci collection we have just received in store. The frames have some classic vintage looks with some vibrant colours and beautiful styling.

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We’ve even been tempted by the latest Gucci sunglasses, and have a small, select range.

Also new in, is the latest Stella McCartney collection. The frames are made from a Bio-based material, and have unusual colours and fun styling.

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Myopia cell discovery

Myopia cell discovered in retina: Dysfunction of cell may be linked to amount of time a child spends indoors

Date:
February 6, 2017
Source:
Northwestern University
Summary:
Scientists have discovered a cell in the retina that may cause myopia when it dysfunctions. The dysfunction may be linked to the amount of time a child spends indoors and away from natural light. This discovery could lead to a new therapeutic target to control myopia. More than a billion people in the world have myopia, whose incidence is rising and is linked to how much time people spend indoors as children.
FULL STORY

 Cells in the eye could be over stimulated by indoor light spectrum, causing damage, say researchers.
 
                                                             
             The light rays are not focused on the retina in a myopic eye. The focal point falls in front of the
              retina.
 

Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered a cell in the retina that may cause myopia when it dysfunctions. The dysfunction may be linked to the amount of time a child spends indoors and away from natural light.

“This discovery could lead to a new therapeutic target to control myopia,” said Greg Schwartz, lead investigator and assistant professor of ophthalmology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

More than a billion people in the world have myopia, whose incidence is rising and is linked to how much time people spend indoors as children.

The newly discovered retinal cell — which is highly sensitive to light — controls how the eye grows and develops. If the cell instructs the eye to grow too long, images fail to be focused on the retina, causing nearsighted vision and a lifetime of corrective glasses or contact lenses.

“The eye needs to stop growing at precisely the right time during childhood,” Schwartz said.

It has long been long known the retina contains a signal to focus the image in the eye, and this signal is important for properly regulating eye growth during childhood.

“But for years no one knew what cell carried the signal,” Schwartz said. “We potentially found the key missing link, which is the cell that actually does that task and the neural circuit that enables this important visual function.”

Schwartz named the cell, “ON Delayed,” in reference to its slow responses to lights becoming brighter. The cell was unique among many other cell types tested in its exquisite sensitivity to whether an image was in focus.

He described the neural circuit as the diagram that reveals how this cell is wired to other cells in the retina to acquire this unique sensitivity.

How too much time indoors may trigger myopia

The indoor light spectrum has high red/green contrast, which activates these clusters of photoreceptors in the human eye, creating the equivalent of an artificial contrast image on the retina. It’s likely the human version of the ON Delayed retinal ganglion cell would be overstimulated by such patterns, causing aberrant over-growth of the eye, leading to myopia, Schwartz said.

 

To conduct the study, Schwartz and co-author Adam Mani, a postdoctoral fellow in ophthalmology at Feinberg, used microscopic glass electrodes to record electrical signals from cells in a mouse retina while presenting patterns of light on a digital projector.

The next goal is to find a gene specific to this cell. Then scientists can turn its activity up or down in a genetic mouse model to try to induce or cure myopia.

The study is part of Schwartz’s larger body of research to reverse engineer the retina by identifying new retinal cell types in mice. The retina has about 50 types of retinal ganglion cells, which together convey all the information we use to perceive the visual world. Each of these cells provides different visual information — such as colour or motion — about any point in space.

Schwartz, who is funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), wants to identify the new cells by their specific function, analyze their genetic signatures and understand how the cells are interconnected within the retina and to their targets in the brain. His research could lead to gene therapy to treat blindness and to improve the function of artificial retinal prosthetics.

 


Story Source:

Materials provided by Northwestern University. Original written by Marla Paul. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Adam Mani, Gregory W. Schwartz. Circuit Mechanisms of a Retinal Ganglion Cell with Stimulus-Dependent Response Latency and Activation Beyond Its Dendrites. Current Biology, 2017; DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2016.12.033