Children’s Eyesight Risk In The Frame

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A recent survey revealed that children now spend nearly five hours a day using the likes of Facebook, watching films & TV and messaging friends.

As an optician it’s worrying that children are spending so long doing such activities as there’s a chance they could be risking their long-term eye health without knowing it.

The problem is blue light which, put simply, is part of the visible light spectrum that we use to see the world. “Good” blue light (Blue-Turquoise) is essential for children’s vision, development and well-being. “Bad” blue light (Blue-Violet) can be harmful to their developing eyes.

What many people don’t know is that blue-violet light is emitted by computers, tablets, smart phones and flat-screen TVs however, banning children from using tech is not really a practical solution and children are actually exposed to higher amounts of blue-violet light in other ways. In homes and schools, energy saving light bulbs radiate this light, while outdoors, come rain or shine, significant amounts of ultra-violet (UV) and blue light from sunlight reach ground level.

The effects of UV rays and blue-violet light are cumulative and can accelerate the development of eye disease during adult life. With an increased exposure to technology much earlier in life and children spending three times more time outside than adults we need to think about protecting their eyes now. Here are my top tips:

Diet – serve up green leafy veg like spinach, kale and broccoli

Tech – limit the amount of time spent on tablets, smartphones or watching TV and encourage them to keep their eyes as far away from the screen as possible.

Sunglasses – a pair of good quality sunglasses offers tremendous protection

Indoors – a new of prescription spectacle lens, Crizal Prevencia, will protect indoors and out. It is designed to let “good” Blue-Turquoise light in and filter out “bad” Blue-Violet light.

Optician – the best thing you can do for your eye health is go for regular eye checks with a trained professional at least every two years.

Riskometer – check your child’s exposure to blue light by using the www.thinkaboutyoureyes.co.uk “Blue Light Riskometer”

Source – Andy Hepworth, Optician


New test needed to assess the quality and safety of sunglasses

Revision of standards is needed to test sunglasses quality and establish safe limits for the lenses’ UV filters, according to research published in the open access journal Biomedical Engineering OnLine.

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Sunglasses and UV protection

Exposure to the sun may deteriorate your sunglasses over time and the lenses may become lighter and so alter the category under which they are classified. It may also diminish the impact resistance of lenses (how ‘shatterproof’ the lens is). Current national and regional standards require that sunglasses provide levels of UV protection linked to the luminous transmittance, which decides the category of the lenses.

Lenses should provide adequate UV filters, because insufficient protection could lead to pathological modifications to the cornea and to the internal structure of the eye. This could cause edema (swelling of the eye which can distort vision), pterygium (growth of pink, fleshy tissue on the white of the eye that can interfere with vision), cataract (clouding of the lens of the eye) and retina damage.

Contact us if you would like to discuss the benefits of sunglasses or to book an Eye Health Exam

Article Credit http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/312587.php