Why do my eyes hurt?

Summary

Mild eye pain can be a symptom of eyestrain or tiredness. The area around the eyes may also hurt during a migraine headache or sinus infection. In some cases, eye pain can also be a symptom of a more serious condition, such as uveitis.

The eyes can hurt in many different ways. A person may feel that their eyes are sore, aching, burning, or stinging, or that they have an object or other foreign body stuck in them.

This article will look at the potential causes of eye pain, some treatments and remedies, and when to see a doctor.

 

Causes

Looking at screens for an extended period of time may cause eyestrain.
Eyestrain
Eyestrain develops when the eyes get tired. This often occurs when someone is completing a task that involves focusing the eyes for long periods of time. This can result in aching, watery, or dry eyes.

Some potential causes of eyestrain include:

  • looking at screens
  • driving
  • reading
  • having exposure to bright lights

Resting the eyes can improve eyestrain. The National Eye Institute (NEI) recommend taking breaks from tasks such as reading every 20 minutes by looking at an object 20 feet away for 20 seconds.

Adjusting the brightness of screens, reducing glare from lights and windows, and taking regular breaks from driving may also help.

An incorrect prescription for eyeglasses can also cause eyestrain and headaches. Vision changes over time, so it is a good idea to undergo regular checkups with an eye doctor.

Dry eye

Dry eye is a common condition. It occurs when the tear ducts do not produce enough tears to keep the eyes moist.

Some symptoms of dry eye include:

  • scratchy eyes
  • burning or stinging eyes
  • sensitivity to light
  • blurry vision
  • redness

Dry eye is most likely to affect older adults, females, and people who do not get enough vitamin A or omega-3 fatty acids in their diet. People with certain autoimmune conditions, such as lupus or Sjogren’s syndrome, are also likely to develop dry eye.

Dry eye can also occur if someone spends a long time looking at a screen, as they may not blink as often. Air conditioning, smoke, and wind can also exacerbate this condition.

Treatment for dry eye includes hydrating eye drops and prescription medication that causes the body to make more tears. Undergoing a medical procedure to block the tear ducts can help if the cause of dry eye is tear ducts that drain too quickly.

Pink eye

Pink eye, or conjunctivitis, results from a virus or bacterium. The most common symptoms are:

  • pink or red eyes
  • itching or burning
  • watery eyes
  • discharge, which could be white, yellow, or green

Viral conjunctivitis usually resolves on its own without treatment. However, people with bacterial conjunctivitis may need antibiotic eye drops or eye ointment.

People with severe or persistent symptoms, and those who notice conjunctivitis symptoms in a newborn baby, should see a doctor.

It is easy to pass pink eye to other people. Therefore, anyone with symptoms of conjunctivitis should wash their hands regularly, especially after touching the eye area. It is also a good idea to temporarily:

  • stop wearing contact lenses
  • stop wearing eye makeup
  • stop sharing towels and other personal items
  • avoid swimming pools

People will be able to resume these activities when the infection has cleared up.

Fungal infection

Fungi can also cause eye infections.

People who work on farms or in gardens, plus those who wear contact lenses, have a higher risk of developing fungal eye infections. People with weaker immune systems, diabetes, and conditions that require corticosteroid treatment may also be more susceptible.

A fungal eye infection can cause:

  • eye pain
  • redness
  • blurred vision
  • sensitivity to light
  • tearing
  • discharge

It is important to seek medical treatment right away for these symptoms. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), all types of fungal eye infection require prescription medication. Treatment may involve antifungal eye drops, medication, or, in some cases, surgery.

Scratched cornea

The cornea is the clear layer of film that covers the front of the eye. A person may scratch their cornea when putting in contact lenses, applying makeup, or rubbing their eyes. The result is eye pain, along with:

  • a feeling that something is stuck in the eye
  • red, watery eyes
  • sensitivity to light
  • blurry vision

To treat a scratched cornea, a doctor may prescribe eye drops, a patch to protect the eye, or a special contact lens that can speed up healing.

According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, mild scratches do not need treatment and will usually heal within 2 days. A larger scratch may take up to 1 week to heal.

Uveitis

According to the NEI, uveitis is a term that describes a range of inflammatory eye conditions. Uveitis can destroy eye tissue and may cause vision loss.

The symptoms include:

  • eye pain
  • blurry vision
  • dark, floating spots in vision
  • sensitivity to light
  • redness

The cause of uveitis is not always clear. It may develop due to an eye injury, infection, tumor, or autoimmune condition. It can be an acute condition that goes away or a chronic condition that reoccurs.

Uveitis needs medical attention. Treatment is usually with prescription eye drops or medication. The aim is to reduce pain and inflammation, prevent tissue damage, and restore vision.

 

Eye pain and other symptoms

If eye pain occurs alongside other symptoms, it may indicate that the person has a different condition causing their eye pain.

Potential conditions include:

  • Sinus infection: Pain that affects the cheeks, forehead, and eyes, along with a blocked nose and fever, may indicate a sinus infection. A doctor can treat a sinus infection with antibiotics.
  • Migraine: Migraine is a condition that causes severe headaches, often on one side of the head. Migraine may cause a sharp pain in or behind the eyes or brow bone, sensitivity to light, and nausea or vomiting.
  • Cervicogenic headache: This type of headache can cause pain around the eyes, on one side of the face or head, and in the neck or shoulders. Nausea, blurred vision, and sensitivity to light or sound can also occur.
Home remedies

Home remedies cannot cure serious eye conditions or infections, such as a fungal infection or uveitis. However, they can provide symptom relief for people with tired, sore, or dry eyes.

Some home remedies include:

  • Resting: Eye pain due to strain and an incorrect prescription can ease when a person rests their eyes. Taking regular breaks from reading or screen work may prevent eyestrain.
  • Using a humidifier: Humidifiers can increase the moisture in the air, which can help people with dry eyes and those who live in dry climates.
  • Trying over-the-counter drops: Hydrating eye drops add moisture to the eyes and can help people with tired or dry eyes feel better.
  • Reducing exposure to irritants: Smoke, high winds, and air conditioning can exacerbate eye dryness. If possible, it may help someone to reduce their exposure to these irritants.
    Stopping smoking: Cigarette smoke irritates the eyes. According to the NEI, smoking also increases the risk of eye disease and optic nerve damage.

The NEI recommend reducing the risk of eye conditions by eating dark, leafy greens, oily fish such as salmon and halibut, and foods that contain vitamin A, such as carrots and broccoli.

 

When to see a doctor

If a person’s eye pain is severe, persistent, or accompanied by other symptoms — such as pus or sensitivity to light — they should see a doctor. Any loss of vision is also a reason to seek medical advice.

People at risk of developing eye disease or complications should also see an optician if they experience any eye pain. This includes people with diabetes, high blood pressure, and conditions that weaken the immune system.

Newborn babies can develop serious conditions as a result of eye infections. Parents and caregivers should take infants with puffy eyelids, red eyes, or eye discharge to a doctor right away.

Summary

Mild eye pain and discomfort are common. These symptoms can develop due to eyestrain or dryness, both of which can occur when someone spends a long period of time focusing the eyes on screens or books.

More severe eye pain may occur due to migraine, a scratched cornea, or an infection. If possible, a person should speak to a doctor about their symptoms.

 

Sources:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/why-do-my-eyes-hurt#seeing-a-doctor

Dry EyeEye Health / BlindnessHeadache / Migraine
9 sourcesexpanded

Boyd, K. (2020). Corneal abrasion and erosion.
https://www.aao.org/eye-health/diseases/what-is-corneal-abrasion
Conjunctivitis (pink eye). (2019).
https://www.cdc.gov/conjunctivitis/
Dry eye. (2019).
https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/eye-conditions-and-diseases/dry-eye
Fungal eye infections. (2017).
https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/fungal-eye-infections/index.html
Keep your eyes healthy. (2020).
https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/healthy-vision/keep-your-eyes-healthy
Pink eye. (2019).
https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/eye-conditions-and-diseases/pink-eye
The complete headache chart. (n.d.).

Uveitis. (2019).
https://www.nei.nih.gov/learn-about-eye-health/eye-conditions-and-diseases/uveitis
Vimont, C. (2020). Eye strain: How to prevent tired eyes.
https://www.aao.org/eye-health/diseases/what-is-eye-strain


Hayfever – a guide to looking after your eyes

The hay fever season runs from spring through to autumn and affects nearly 18 million people in the UK. Hay fever sufferers have allergic reactions to different types of pollen, which include itchy eyes and nose, sneezing, runny or blocked nose and difficulty in breathing. Pollen grains can set off an allergic reaction as the conjunctiva (the transparent membrane covering the white of the eye) becomes inflamed causing watery, red, itchy eyes. The whites of your eyes may swell up and you may also experience a gritty feeling in your eyes.

Managing your hay fever:
  • Stay indoors – when there is a high pollen count, keep windows and doors closed and keep surfaces clear with a damp duster. Avoid going out in the early evening and midmorning when the pollen count is at its highest.
  • Wear sunglasses when you are outdoors – wraparound glasses offer more protection from pollen.
  • Wear glasses rather than your contact lenses – especially when the pollen count is high.
  • Change your clothes and have a shower – if you have been outside for a while, you may have pollen on your clothes, skin and hair. Taking a shower and changing your clothes can help.
    Bathe your eyes regularly in cold water.
  • Apply petroleum jelly to your nostrils – this will trap pollen.

 

Treating your hay fever:
  • Anti-allergy eye drops – these act as a protective defence. If you wear contact lenses remember to check if you can use the drops while your lenses are in. The College has produced an infographic which gives guidance on the best time to start taking eye drops depending on your allergy.
  • Antihistamines – in people with allergies, the body mistakes something harmless, such as pollen, for a threat and produces histamine, which causes symptoms such as rashes, a runny nose and/or sneezing. Taking Antihistamines before you come into contact with pollen can prevent this happening or can help reduce the severity of the symptoms if taken afterwards.
  • Steroid eye drops – these are very effective but can have serious side effects, such as glaucoma, cataracts and damage to the cornea. They are only available on prescription.

Source:

College of Optometrists website . Lookafter your eyes – Hay fever


Aritificial intelligence used to develop an early warning system for AMD

Researchers at Moorfields Eye Hospital and UCL Institute of Ophthalmology have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that can help predict whether people with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) will develop the more serious form of the condition in their ‘good eye’. This is part of our wider, ongoing partnership with DeepMind and Google Health.

AMD involves damage to the macula, the central part of the retina at the back of the eye. AMD causes loss of central vision, affecting the ability to read, drive, watch television, recognise faces, and many other activities of daily living. It is very common that patients develop wet AMD in one eye and start receiving treatment, before later developing it in their other eye.

Macular degeneration mainly affects central vision, causing “blind spots” directly ahead (Macular Society).

 

The AI system developed by Moorfields, researchers from DeepMind, and Google Health, may allow closer monitoring of the “good eye” in patients at high risk, or even guide use of preventative treatments in the future.

Pearse Keane, consultant ophthalmologist at Moorfields Eye Hospital, said:

“Patients who have lost vision from wet AMD are often particularly worried that their “good eye” will become affected and, as a result, that they will become blind. We hope that this AI system can be used as an early warning system for this condition and thus help preserve sight.”

“We are already beginning to think about how this will let us plan clinical trials of preventative therapies – for example, by treating eyes at high risk earlier.”

“With this work, we haven’t solved AMD, but we believe we have found another big piece of the puzzle.”

Reena Chopra, research optometrist at Moorfields Eye Hospital, said:

“We found that the ophthalmologists and optometrists in our study had some intuition into which eyes will progress to wet AMD. The AI was able to outperform them, indicating there are signals within OCT scans that only the AI can detect. This unlocks new areas of research into a disease where there are still many unanswered questions about how it develops.”

Source:

Read the paper in Nature Medicine.

Read the Google Health blog and DeepMind technical blog.


Eye Health: The Importance of Protecting Your Eyes

UV PROTECTION


UV rays can lead to serious health issues including sunburn of the eyes, cataracts, macular degeneration and cancer.

All Maui Jim lenses block 100% of all harmful UV rays, protecting your eyes from damage and long-term health risks. Sunglasses that do not provide UV protection can actually cause more damage because they shade the eye, allowing for more UV rays to hit the pupil.

 

SKIN CANCER


5% to 10% of skin cancer occurs around the eyes. Always wear quality, protective sunglasses when outdoors—even on overcast days.

Our sunglasses have earned the Skin Cancer Foundation Seal of Recommendation as an effective UV filter for the eyes and surrounding skin. The frames also play a role, so larger frames and wrap styles should be considered for outdoor activities.

 

EYE COMFORT & GLARE


The sun’s brightness and glare interferes with comfortable vision and the ability to see clearly, causes squinting, and your eyes to water. Eyestrain can also lead to headaches.

All Maui Jim sunglasses are polarised and therefore eliminate 99.9% of glare. This also reduces the impact of the sun’s brightness and allows your eyes to stay relaxed. Without the need to squint and strain, you can avoid eye fatigue, excessive wrinkling around the eyes, and even headaches.

 

DARK ADAPTATION

Intense sunlight can hamper the eyes’ ability to adapt quickly to lower light levels. Think about when you’re outside in bright light and not wearing sunglasses, then go indoors where the light is much dimmer; you see spots for a while until your eyes adjust.

By shielding your eyes from intense sunlight with our lenses, your eyes have a chance to gain faster adaptations when going from one extreme light condition to the next.

 

BLUE LIGHT PROTECTION


High-Energy Visible Radiation (HEV), also known as blue light, has lower energy rays than UV. However, recent research suggests they can penetrate the eye, and this has been associated with AMD (age-related macular degeneration).

Our patented PolarizedPlus2® lens technology reduces HEV without removing the beautiful visible blues colours from the world around you.

Source: Maui Jim Eye Health (https://www.mauijim.com/GB/en_GB/eyehealth)


How Does the Eye Work?

The human eye is a wonder of engineering. It consists of many different parts that work together to provide visual information to the brain, which then translates it into information that is useful to the body.

Parts of the eye

1. The cornea

The first step in this complex process occurs when light passes through the clear slightly convex cornea at the very front of the eye. This is the transparent part of the eyeball.

A thick white sheath called the sclera surrounds the rest of the eyeball. The cornea refracts light slightly. The narrow, liquid-filled space behind the cornea is called the aqueous humor. This drains through spaces at the medial corner of the eye, and is constantly renewed.

2. The iris

The iris is a colored diaphragm of thin circular and longitudinal muscle fibers just behind the cornea. It has an aperture in the center. This can expand or contract to let in more or less light, respectively, depending on the light in the surroundings.

This opening is called the pupil. Light passing through the cornea and the pupil falls on the anterior surface of the lens. The aqueous humor keeps the iris from sticking to the lens behind and the cornea in front.

3. The lens

The lens is a clear crystalline globe which almost touches the posterior surface of the pupillary opening. The ciliary muscles are attached to the surface of the lens. The help the lens to change shape in order to focus.

As they contract, they cause the lens to become more round or long, so that the rays bend more or less, according to need. If the object focused on is far away, the lens needs to bend the light rays from it more sharply, to make them fall on the center of the retina, where vision is sharpest. For objects close-up, the lens becomes elongated so that light rays are bent less.

4. The posterior chamber

The refracted rays now pass through the jelly-like tissue that fills out the eyeball behind the lens. This part is called the posterior chamber. At the back, the eyeball is bounded by the choroid, a network of capillaries which nourishes all the structures of the eye.

In front of it lies the retinal pigment epithelium, a layer of melanin-rich cells which supplies special nutrition to the sensory layer of the eye. The retina is nourished and renewed by the pigment epithelial cells.

5. The retina

The retina is a multilayer membrane comprising a sensory photoreceptor array, a few layers of connecting neurons and an inner ganglion cell layer. The axons from the ganglion cells travel backward to pierce the retina and leave the eye through the optic nerve. There is a blind spot in the retina where the ganglion cells pass through.

Rods and cones

The photoreceptors in the eye consist of rod and cone cells. The rods are found mostly in the peripheral part of the retina and are responsible for perception of light and dark, including shades of gray. They are more numerous than cones, and are very sensitive to light.

The cone cells are responsible for visual acuity and color vision, and millions of them are closely assembled in the central part of the retina, also called the macula. At the fovea, which is the central point of the macula, only cones are present, and normal vision uses this point to achieve sharp vision at maximum resolution.

The pathway of vision
As the light rays fall on the photoreceptor cells, changes occur in the pigments they contain. This leads to bleaching of the pigments, and electrical impulses are generated. These are transmitted through a chain of neurons to the ganglion cells which carry the impulses to the visual cortex of the brain. There they are processed and the object is seen.

Each eye receives information from half of the visual field. Thus the middle parts of both fields overlap, and this leads to binocular vision. However, the difference in the peripheral parts of the left and right fields of vision lead to depth perception or three-dimensional vision. It helps in gauging distances accurately and estimating the depths and dimensions of objects.

Sources:

The Structure and Function of the Eyes, www.merckmanuals.com/…/structure-and-function-of-the-eyes
Healthy Eyes Facts, https://nei.nih.gov/health/healthyeyes
Eye and its Function, http://www.pages.drexel.edu/~dh329/bmes212/eyeFunction.html
Last Updated: Feb 26, 2019

Written by Dr. Liji Thomas


What to know about computer vision syndrome

Computer vision syndrome (CVS) is the term for a group of eye and vision-related problems that develop following the prolonged use of devices with digital screens.

Devices such as computers, tablets, and smartphones put increased demands on a person’s visual system. Using these devices for extended periods without breaks can cause CVS symptoms, including eye strain and headaches.

In this article, we explain what CVS is and outline its causes and symptoms. We also provide tips on how to avoid CVS and when to see an optometrist.

What is it?

The extended use of devices with screens may lead to eye strain and headaches.
CVS describes a group of symptoms that occur following the prolonged use of devices with digital screens. Such devices include:

  • personal computers
  • laptops
  • tablets
  • smartphones

Common symptoms of CVS include eye strain and headaches. A person may also experience neck and shoulder pain as a result of sitting for long periods.

It is not clear how much time a person needs to spend looking at a digital screen to develop CVS. However, according to the American Optometric Association (AOA), longer periods of screen use seem to correlate with higher levels of discomfort.

Causes

Computer vision syndrome occurs as a result of prolonged digital screen use.

Digital screens cause a person’s eyes to work harder than normal. Several factors are responsible for this, including:

  • the screen content being less sharp or focused
  • poor contrast of the screen’s content against its background
  • reflections or glare bouncing off the screen

The following factors may also contribute to CVS:

  • viewing the screen in low light conditions
  • being too close to or too far from the screen
  • positioning the screen at an angle that causes eye strain
  • taking insufficient screen breaks

Together, these factors put greater demands on the eyes’ ability to track and focus. These demands are even higher for people who have minor uncorrected vision problems.

If the additional demands on the visual system occur over extended periods, a person may experience symptoms of CVS.

Symptoms

The symptoms of CVS may differ from one person to another. Some common symptoms include:

  • eye strain
  • dry and itchy eyes
  • blurry vision
  • double vision
  • difficulty focusing
  • nearsightedness, also called myopia
  • headaches
  • neck or shoulder pain and stiffness
  • backache

Treatment

The symptoms of CVS will usually go away after a sufficient break from screen use.

However, people who have underlying eye or vision problems will need to treat these problems to prevent future episodes of CVS. Some potential treatment options include those below.

Regular eye examinations

People who do not visit their optician regularly may have undiagnosed vision problems that worsen as a result of prolonged screen use. Others may be using outdated prescription glasses or lenses that are no longer effective in correcting their vision problems.

Regular visits to an optician can reduce the risk of CVS and other vision problems.

Vision therapy

Vision therapy is a form of therapy that aims to develop or improve a person’s vision. It involves the use of eye exercises to improve eye movement and focusing.

Vision therapy may be an option for people who continue to experience CVS and other vision problems despite wearing corrective glasses or contact lenses.

Laser eye surgery

Some people with underlying vision problems may be good candidates for laser eye surgery. This procedure uses lasers to reshape the surface of the eye so that it can focus more effectively.

Prevention

The best way to prevent CVS is to avoid long and uninterrupted periods of digital screen use. However, this is not an option for many people who work at a computer.

The AOA recommend following the 20-20-20 rule when working at a computer. Doing this involves taking a 20-second break every 20 minutes to view something that is 20 feet away. Following the 20-20-20 rule can reduce eye strain from digital screen use.

Other tips for preventing the symptoms of CVS include:

  • positioning the screen at the optimal distance, which will be about 20–28 inches from the eyes
  • positioning the screen at a comfortable angle, with the center of the screen 15–20 degrees below eye level
  • ensuring that there is adequate lighting
  • using an antiglare screen or changing the angle of the screen to avoid glare from lighting
  • remembering to blink regularly enough to avoid eye dryness
  • wearing glasses or lenses to correct any underlying vision problems, where necessary
  • sitting comfortably with both feet flat on the floor and support in place for the arms while typing
  • taking regular rest breaks

When to see an optometrist

In many cases, the symptoms of CVS will go away once a person has spent sufficient time away from digital screens.

To prevent future episodes of CVS, a person should take steps to improve their work environment and adopt healthful screen-management habits.

A person should visit their optician if they continue to experience CVS symptoms despite making the necessary changes to their screen use. Persistent symptoms can sometimes be a sign of an underlying eye condition that requires appropriate treatment.

Summary

Computer vision syndrome describes a group of symptoms that can arise as a result of prolonged screen use. Common symptoms of CVS include eye strain and headaches.

CVS can affect anyone who looks at a computer, tablet, or smartphone screen for long periods without breaks. However, it is particularly prevalent among people who have underlying vision problems.

The symptoms of CVS tend to subside once a person has taken a sufficient break from viewing digital screens. People can prevent future episodes by creating a comfortable work environment and adopting habits to maintain good eye health. Following the 20-20-20 rule is an effective way to reduce the risk of eye strain.

 

Source:

www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/computer-vision-syndrome#summary

20/20/20 to prevent digital eye strain. (2016).
https://www.aoa.org/documents/infographics/SaveYourVisionMonth2016-1.pdf
Computer vision syndrome. (n.d.).
https://www.aoa.org/patients-and-public/caring-for-your-vision/protecting-your-vision/computer-vision-syndrome
Laser eye surgery and lens surgery. (2020).
https://www.nhs.uk/live-well/healthy-body/laser-eye-surgery/
Loh, K. Y., & Redd, S. C. (2008). Understanding and preventing computer vision syndrome.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4170366/
Tran, K., & Ryce, A. (2018). Laser refractive surgery for vision correction: A review of clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK532537/
Vision therapy. (2016).
https://aapos.org/glossary/vision-therapy


Covid19 safety measures in practice update

As the COVID 19 regulations have now eased, we are able to offer routine examinations in addition to examinations for those who may have specific concerns about their vision.

Please contact the practice on 020 72220066 or email info@uniaopticians.co.uk to book an appointment.

We are currently available on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, from 10.00am to 4.00pm, but please check our website & contact us as these are due to change to allow for more appointments.

We are operating a closed door system, so we can control the number of customers in the practice at any time. All staff are wearing full PPE, and we would request all customers entering the practice to wear a face covering. (This can be provided if patients do not already have one) There are hand sanitiser stations both at the door and throughout the store.

We are able to dispense spectacle frames from our complete range, for prescriptions to be made up, and are sanitising any frames that are tried on after each customer. All equipment & surfaces are also sanitised after each customer visit.

In order to limit face to face contact we are able to carry out OCT scanning & retinal imaging. This enables us to have a fully detailed view of the retina and to detect the potential for many ocular diseases.

We look forward to seeing you soon.

The Unia Team.

 


Covid19 safety measures in practice

As guidelines continually change, we are now open for emergency and essential eyecare.
This means that if you have any concerns about your vision or you are feeling anxious about your
eyes, we are now able to see you, on an appointment only basis.

This also includes circumstances where you would like to update your prescription where a change
has occurred, if you require a spare pair of glasses, repairs, wish to purchase sunglasses or where
your contact lens supply is due.

However, it is still necessary for you to call or email the practice first so that we can best manage
appointments to minimize face to face contact.

Where a prescription is out of date, in the absence of any problems, a telephone consultation/video
call can be arranged to verify that all is well before the glasses are dispensed.
All routine eye examinations remain suspended in the UK.

In order to maintain social distancing within the practice, we are operating a closed-door policy.
We would like to reassure you that we are following strict hygiene and sanitizing practices within the
consulting room and throughout the store so that everyone remains safe and all staff will be wearing
the necessary PPE.

Currently, the frames may not be directly accessible to touch on the shelves, however they can still
be viewed and tried on, as many as desired. All frames that have been handled, will be thoroughly
sanitized to ensure safety for successive patients. Wherever possible, when ready, spectacles will be
posted to patent’s homes to avoid unnecessary travel/risk.

Contact lens patients will be able to reorder a routine supply of contact lenses and in most cases,
these can be delivered directly to homes. Where a contact lens after care is due, in the absence
of any problems, a telephone/video call can be arranged to verify that all is well before the lenses
are ordered. Patients will then be asked to return for a full after care appointment once guidelines
change/as necessary.

Contact lens solutions, eye drops, supplements and other accessories will still be available.
Again, these can be posted out to patient homes to prevent unnecessary travel to the practice.
If you are feeling unwell or have been in contact with someone with Covid 19 we advise you not
to attend the practice until it is safe to do so. If any patient is unsure of their symptoms, they are
advised to call NHS 111 for advice.

We look forward to welcoming you back soon, albeit to a new ‘normal’

Best wishes

The Unia Team

 


Practice reopening 1st of June

We are pleased to inform you that we will be reopening the practice on the 1st of June 2020, by appointment only. For the foreseeable future, we will be operating a closed door policy to maintain social distancing. This is in line with current government and regulatory guidelines which we continue to monitor closely.

Our temporary opening hours will be Monday, Wednesday and Thursday 10am to 3.30pm. Please call or email in advance before attending.

As we prepare to reopen, the health and well-being of our patients and staff remains our priority. Strict hygiene measures, social distancing and use of appropriate PPE will continue to be in place to ensure everyone’s safety.

If you have any queries, please email us at info@uniaopticians.co.uk. Please check our ‘News’ page for full details and further updates.

As always, we remain committed to providing our patients with excellent customer care and service and look forward to welcoming you back very soon.

 

 


Eye health: Our top tips for healthy eyes

Eye health

Our top tips for healthy eyes

  • Have regular check-ups

Have your eyes tested every two years even if you think your vision is fine. An eye test can spot some eye conditions and other illnesses not related to sight. Regular check-ups are vital even if you have no symptoms.

  • Find out your family eye health history

Talk to your relatives about your family eye health history. Some eye conditions have genetic links which increase your risk of developing them. Share this information with your optometrist or eye health professional.

  • Take care of your contact lenses

If you wear contact lenses make sure you look after them properly. Thoroughly wash and dry your hands before touching your contact lenses or your eyes. Your lenses and their case should only ever be cleaned with the lens solution recommended by your optometrist. Always follow the instructions given to you by your optometrist or the lens manufacturer.

  • Wear sunglasses

Protect your eyes when it is sunny or when you’re in high glare areas such as near snow or water. The CE or BS EN 1836:2005 marks indicate that sunglasses provide a safe level of protection from the sun’s damaging UVA and UVB rays. Ongoing UV exposure can increase your risk of developing cataracts or macular degeneration.

  • Protect your eyes

Wear safety glasses or protective goggles to protect your eyes from injury if you work with hazardous or airborne materials. This applies to home too if you are doing DIY, gardening or setting off fireworks.

  • Keep fit and healthy

Being fit and well can help your eyes stay healthy. Maintaining a healthy weight and blood pressure may help with eye health. Protect your eyes when playing sports involving flying balls.

  • Eat well

Make sure your diet includes nutrients such as Omega 3 fatty acids, zinc and vitamins C and E. These may help to prevent or delay age-related vision problems such as macular degeneration and cataracts. Recommended foods for general good health include green leafy vegetables, oily fish such as salmon and citrus fruits.

  • Stop smoking

Smoking is harmful to your eyes and can increase the risk of sight loss. Current smokers are 2-4 times more at risk of developing macular degeneration than people who have never smoked.

  • Avoid recreational drugs

There is evidence to suggest that some recreational drugs can cause sight loss – particularly alkyl nitrites, also known as poppers.

 

Facts about sight loss

  • Every 5 seconds someone in the world goes blind
  • Every day 100 people in the UK start to lose their sight
  • Almost 2 million people in the UK are living with significant sight loss. The number is predicted to rise to around 2.3 million by 2020 and almost 4 million by 2050
  • Around 360,000 people in the UK are registered blind or partially sighted
  • An estimated 25,000 children in Britain are blind or partially sighted
  • 86% of people in the UK value their sight above any other sense
  • Sight loss can affect people of any age but the likelihood increases as you get older: One in five people over 70 are living with sight loss
  • Black and Asian people are at greater risk of developing certain conditions which can result in the onset of some of the leading causes of sight loss