Eye Twitching: 8 Causes and Treatments

Woman rubbing her eyes to deal with eyelid twitching.

Causes of eye twitching include:

  • Stress
  • Fatigue
  • Eye strain
  • Caffeine
  • Alcohol
  • Dry eyes
  • Nutrition problems
  • Allergies

What is an eye twitch?

An eye twitch (or more accurately an eyelid twitch) is an uncontrollable eyelid spasm. Most eye twitching lasts only a few minutes, but sometimes an eyelid twitch can persist for days or longer.

When your eyelid is twitching, you might think everyone else can see it. But most eye twitches are subtle and are not easily seen by others.

The medical term for eye twitching is myokymia.

How can I stop eye twitching?

To stop your eyelid twitching, figure out what the possible causes might be.

Sometimes, making minor changes to your diet and lifestyle can significantly reduce your risk of eye twitching or help make an eyelid twitch disappear.

Let’s review the causes of eye twitching and the possible solutions:

1. Stress

Stress is probably the most common cause of eye twitching. Yoga, breathing exercises, spending time with friends or pets and getting more down time into your schedule are ways to reduce stress that may be causing your eyelid twitch.

2. Fatigue

Lack of sleep, whether because of stress or some other reason, can trigger eye twitching. Catching up on your sleep and having a consistent sleep schedule can help.

3. Eye strain

Eye strain — particularly digital eye strain from overuse of computers, tablets and smartphones — also is a common cause of eyelid twitching.

Follow the “20-20-20 rule” when using digital devices: Every 20 minutes, look away from your screen and allow your eyes to focus on a distant object (at least 20 feet away) for 20 seconds or longer. This reduces fatigue that may trigger eye twitching.

Also, ask your optician about computer eyeglasses to relieve digital eye strain.

4. Caffeine

Too much caffeine can trigger eye twitching. Try cutting back on coffee, tea and soft drinks (or switch to decaffeinated versions) for a week or two and see if your eye twitching disappears.

5. Alcohol

If you experience eye twitching after drinking beer, wine or liquor, take a break from the booze, since alcohol consumption may cause eyelids to twitch.

6. Dry eyes

Many adults experience dry eyes, especially after age 50. Dry eyes also are very common among people who use computers, take certain medications (especially antihistamines and some antidepressants), wear contact lenses and consume caffeine and/or alcohol.

If you have a twitching eyelid and your eyes feel gritty or dry, consult your eye doctor for an evaluation. Restoring moisture to the surface of your eye may stop the twitching and decrease the risk of twitching in the future.

7. Nutrition problems

Some reports suggest a lack of certain nutritional elements, such as magnesium, can trigger eyelid spasms. Although these reports are not conclusive, this may be another possible cause of eye twitching.

If you are concerned that your diet may not be supplying all the nutrients you need for healthy vision, discuss this with your eye doctor before purchasing over-the-counter nutritional supplements.

8. Allergies

People with eye allergies can have itching, swelling and watery eyes. Rubbing your eyes because of allergy symptoms releases histamine into your eyelid tissues and tear film, which may cause eye twitching.

Sometimes, over-the-counter eye drops formulated to reduce allergy symptoms can be helpful, but antihistamines in these drops can cause dry eyes.

It’s best to consult your eye doctor to make sure you’re doing the right thing for your eyes if you experience allergy symptoms and eye twitching.

Can Botox stop my eye twitching?

In rare cases, some eye twitching just won’t go away, despite identifying possible causes and applying the suggested treatments.

Persistent eyelids twitches can be treated with Botox injections to stop the involuntary muscle contractions in the eyelid that cause the twitching.

When to see an optician

See an optician immediately if you experience persistent eye twitching, sudden changes in appearance or movement of half your face (including your eyelids), or if both eyelids clamp down so tight it’s impossible to open your eyes. These can be signs of a serious condition.

If your eye twitching doesn’t go away, it could signal a serious neurological condition affecting the eyelid — such as blepharospasm or hemifacial spasm.

These relatively rare conditions are more obvious and severe than common eye twitching and should be evaluated immediately by an optician.

Source: allaboutvision.com/conditions/eye-twitching.htm


Cataracts: Types, symptoms and treatments

Cataract is the clouding of the eye’s natural lens. It is the most common cause of vision loss in people over age 40 and is also the principal cause of blindness in the world. Types of cataracts include:

  • A subcapsular cataract occurs at the back of the lens. People with diabetes or those taking high doses of steroid medications have a greater risk of developing a subcapsular cataract.
  • A nuclear cataract forms deep in the central zone (nucleus) of the lens. Nuclear cataracts usually are associated with ageing.
  • A cortical cataract is characterised by white, wedge-like opacities that start in the periphery of the lens and work their way to the centre in a spoke-like fashion. This type of cataract occurs in the lens cortex, which is the part of the lens that surrounds the central nucleus.
Cataract symptoms and signs

At first, a cataract has little effect on your vision. You may notice that your vision is blurred a little, like looking through a cloudy piece of glass or viewing an impressionist painting.

Hazy, blurred vision may mean you have a cataract.

A cataract may make light from the sun or a lamp seem too bright or glaring. Or you may notice when you drive at night that the oncoming headlights cause more glare than before. Colours may not appear as bright as they once did.

The type of cataract you have will affect exactly which symptoms you experience and how soon they will occur. When a nuclear cataract first develops, it can bring about a temporary improvement in your near vision, called “second sight.”

Unfortunately, the improved vision is short-lived and will disappear as the cataract worsens. On the other hand, a subcapsular cataract may not produce any symptoms until it’s well-developed.

If you think you have a cataract, see an optician for an exam to find out for sure.

What causes cataracts?

The lens inside the eye works much like a camera lens, focusing light onto the retina for clear vision. It also adjusts the eye’s focus, letting us see things clearly both up close and far away.

The lens is mostly made of water and protein. The protein is arranged in a precise way that keeps the lens clear and lets light pass through it.

But as we age, some of the protein may clump together and start to cloud a small area of the lens. This is a cataract, and over time, it may grow larger and cloud more of the lens, making it harder to see.

No one knows for sure why the eye’s lens changes as we age, forming cataracts. But researchers worldwide have identified factors that may cause cataracts or are associated with cataract development.

Besides advancing age, cataract risk factors include:

  • Ultraviolet radiation
  • Diabetes
  • Hypertension
  • Obesity
  • Smoking
  • Prolonged use of corticosteroid medications
  • Statin medicines used to reduce cholesterol
  • Previous eye injury or inflammation
  • Previous eye surgery
  • Hormone replacement therapy
  • Significant alcohol consumption
  • High myopia (short sightedness)
  • Family history

One theory of cataract formation is that many cataracts are caused by oxidative changes in the human lens. This is supported by nutrition studies that show fruits and vegetables high in antioxidants may help prevent certain types of cataracts.

Cataract prevention

Though there is significant controversy about whether cataracts can be prevented, a number of studies suggest certain nutrients and nutritional supplements may reduce your risk of cataracts.

One 10-year study of female health professionals found that higher dietary intakes of vitamin E and the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin from food and supplements were associated with significantly decreased risks of cataract.

Good food sources of vitamin E include sunflower seeds, almonds and spinach. Good sources of lutein and zeaxanthin include spinach, kale and other green, leafy vegetables.

Other studies have shown antioxidant vitamins such as vitamin C and foods containing omega-3 fatty acids may reduce cataract risk.

Another step you can take to reduce your risk of cataracts is to wear sunglasses that block 100 percent of the sun’s UV rays when you are outdoors.

Cataract treatment

When symptoms begin to appear, you may be able to improve your vision for a while using new glasses, strong bifocals, magnification, appropriate lighting or other visual aids.

Think about surgery when your cataracts have progressed enough to seriously impair your vision and affect your daily life.

Many people consider poor vision an inevitable fact of ageing, but cataract surgery is a simple, relatively painless procedure to regain vision.

During surgery, the surgeon will remove your clouded lens and in most cases replace it with a clear, plastic intraocular lens (IOL).

New IOLs are being developed to make the surgery less complicated for surgeons and the lenses more helpful to patients. Presbyopia-correcting IOLs potentially help you see at all distances, not just one. Another new type of IOL blocks both ultraviolet radiation and high-energy visible blue light, which research indicates may damage the retina.

Eyewear after cataract surgery

In most cases, unless you choose presbyopia-correcting IOLs, you will still need reading glasses after cataract surgery. You may also need progressive lenses to correct mild residual refractive errors as well as presbyopia.

For the best vision and comfort possible with glasses prescribed after cataract surgery, ask your optician to explain the benefits of anti-reflective coating and photochromic lenses.

 

Source:

www.allaboutvision.com/en-gb/conditions/cataracts/


Eye Health: The Importance of Protecting Your Eyes

UV PROTECTION


UV rays can lead to serious health issues including sunburn of the eyes, cataracts, macular degeneration and cancer.

All Maui Jim lenses block 100% of all harmful UV rays, protecting your eyes from damage and long-term health risks. Sunglasses that do not provide UV protection can actually cause more damage because they shade the eye, allowing for more UV rays to hit the pupil.

 

SKIN CANCER


5% to 10% of skin cancer occurs around the eyes. Always wear quality, protective sunglasses when outdoors—even on overcast days.

Our sunglasses have earned the Skin Cancer Foundation Seal of Recommendation as an effective UV filter for the eyes and surrounding skin. The frames also play a role, so larger frames and wrap styles should be considered for outdoor activities.

 

EYE COMFORT & GLARE


The sun’s brightness and glare interferes with comfortable vision and the ability to see clearly, causes squinting, and your eyes to water. Eyestrain can also lead to headaches.

All Maui Jim sunglasses are polarised and therefore eliminate 99.9% of glare. This also reduces the impact of the sun’s brightness and allows your eyes to stay relaxed. Without the need to squint and strain, you can avoid eye fatigue, excessive wrinkling around the eyes, and even headaches.

 

DARK ADAPTATION

Intense sunlight can hamper the eyes’ ability to adapt quickly to lower light levels. Think about when you’re outside in bright light and not wearing sunglasses, then go indoors where the light is much dimmer; you see spots for a while until your eyes adjust.

By shielding your eyes from intense sunlight with our lenses, your eyes have a chance to gain faster adaptations when going from one extreme light condition to the next.

 

BLUE LIGHT PROTECTION


High-Energy Visible Radiation (HEV), also known as blue light, has lower energy rays than UV. However, recent research suggests they can penetrate the eye, and this has been associated with AMD (age-related macular degeneration).

Our patented PolarizedPlus2® lens technology reduces HEV without removing the beautiful visible blues colours from the world around you.

Source: Maui Jim Eye Health (https://www.mauijim.com/GB/en_GB/eyehealth)


Half price Summer frame sale now on.

Selected frames at half price when purchased with lenses.

Selected sunglasses half price.


Maui Jim Sunglasses

Not only do Maui have an extensive range of new styles available ready-to-wear and as prescription, they also offer the Maui Reader which gives all the benefits of the ready-to-wear sunspec lens with an added reading segment.


Moscot Open Day

We are really pleased to have the Moscot sun collection in store on Thursday 13th June.

Join us for tea and cake, or perhaps a glass of something sparkling, and see the full collection of classic styles.

We will be open until 6.00pm.


Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) capability now available at Unia Opticians.

OCT is an imaging method which is similar to ultrasound but works with light waves rather than sound. It can aid the early detection of diseases such as glaucoma and macular degeneration.

This straightforward and non invasive way of assessing detail of the retina can be used to evaluate the ocular health of both adults and children.

We are now pleased to offer an OCT scan as an extra service alongside the existing thorough eye examination.

Please visit or call the store for further details.


Lindberg buffalo horn frames now in stock.

We are excited to announce we are now stockists of Lindberg buffalo horn and wood+ horn frames.

The materials are ethically sourced, and each frame is unique.

The front of a horn frame is made of layers of laminated buffalo horn, a natural and porous material. It is impossible to produce two identical fronts. The colour choices are  light brown, medium brown, dark brown and deep black, depending on which part of horn they are taken from. Each frame will vary in texture.

Wood + horn (TRÆ + BUFFALO) fronts are made of one layer of timber (Olive, Padauk, Ebony or Smoked Oak) and a multilayer of buffalo horn-backing.

Because they are natural materials, both horn and wood+horn fronts need to be kept hydrated, as they tend to dehydrate with time. Each frame is supplied with a care kit, and we offer an annual service to ensure the quality is maintained.


MOSCOT now in store

 

 

   

We now have the iconic Moscot frames in stock, including the Johnny Depp made famous Lemtosh.

Come and view the lookbooks in store, to see the entire collection of Original and Spirit frames.

 

 


National Eye Health Week Day 2

We have a selection of information leaflets available to pick up in store, regarding all elements of eye health,

includingcomputer screen use, eating well for eye health and looking after children’s eyes.