Adidas Performance Eyewear

adidas Sport eyewear is now a complete optical supplier offering a new range of unique sports lenses made for adidas frames.

WHY PRESCRIPTION
Just a small change in prescription drastically increases your risk of losing focus. High quality sports eyewear protects the eyes and provides first class vision. For athletes who require prescription lenses, adidas eyewear offers a range of prescription solutions compatible with their individual needs and types of sport. You can choose between direct glazing, adapter, and clip-in solutions to ensure optimal performance through optimal vision – your individual prescription solution, built for performance!

adidas Sport eyewear uses Shamir’s Attitude III® sports design for both Single Vision and Progressive lenses (direct glazing/adapter solutions) with our unique LSTTM  technology.

LSTTM works like a color equalizer, enhancing the perception of pure primary colors.
This results in an improved color perception and high contrast vision.

Perfect for sports that takes you in and out of shaded areas.

KEY BENEFITS
• less eye stress and better vision for your sport
• constant, high contrast vision
• improved natural color perception
• enhancement of details and contours
• equal light harmonization
• reducing light to a comfortable level

Shamir Attitude III®  Progressive and Single Vision sports lenses support a wide range of panoramic angles and base curves to optimally suit the wrap angle of adidas Sport eyewear while mainting all of the design advantages.

LSTTM technology is only available in adidas Sport eyewear.

Our best selling collection evil eye halfrim pro is now available with our latest innovation, the Vario lens.

The new photochromic Vario lenses have the ability to automatically change
FROM A CRYSTAL CLEAR TO DARK TINT, featuring a transmission range from 14 to 89%. Utilizing our Injection Technology, the wafer inlay is injected directly into the lens. The vario wafer allows the vario lens to automatically adapt to natural lighting conditions (UV radiation), at a speed that rivals that of the best on the market. The adidas Sport eyewear Vario lens offers maximum longevity and durability thanks to the use of our ingenious Injection Technology.


After blindness, the adult brain can learn to see again

More than 40 million people worldwide are blind, and many of them reach this condition after many years of slow and progressive retinal degeneration. The development of sophisticated prostheses or new light-responsive elements, aiming to replace the disrupted retinal function and to feed restored visual signals to the brain, has provided new hope. However, very little is known about whether the brain of blind people retains residual capacity to process restored or artificial visual inputs. A new study published in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Elisa Castaldi and Maria Concetta Morrone from the University of Pisa, Italy, and colleagues investigates the brain’s capability to process visual information after many years of total blindness, by studying patients affected by Retinitis Pigmentosa, a hereditary illness of the retina that gradually leads to complete blindness.

Fundus of the patient’s eye implanted with Argus II Retinal 98 Prosthesis, taken soon after the surgery Image Credit: Castaldi E, Cicchini GM, Cinelli L, Biagi L, Rizzo S, Morrone MC (2016)

 

The perceptual and brain responses of a group of patients were assessed before and after the implantation of a prosthetic implant that senses visual signals and transmits them to the brain by stimulating axons of retinal ganglion cells. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, the researchers found that patients learned to recognize unusual visual stimuli, such as flashes of light, and that this ability correlated with increased brain activity. However, this change in brain activity, observed at both the thalamic and cortical level, took extensive training over a long period of time to become established: the more the patient practiced, the more their brain responded to visual stimuli, and the better they perceived the visual stimuli using the implant. In other words, the brain needs to learn to see again.

The results are important as they show that after the implantation of a prosthetic device the brain undergoes plastic changes to re-learn how to make use of the new artificial and probably aberrant visual signals. They demonstrate a residual plasticity of the sensory circuitry of the adult brain after many years of deprivation, which can be exploited in the development of new prosthetic implants.

Article: Visual BOLD Response in Late Blind Subjects with Argus II Retinal Prosthesis, Castaldi E, Cicchini GM, Cinelli L, Biagi L, Rizzo S, Morrone MC, PLOS Biology, doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1002569,